What’s in my mobile phone?

The raw materials in a mobile phone come from a variety of mines, with some metal recycling as well. There are an estimated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide. You can find a list of what they typically contain here:

The raw materials in a mobile phone come from a variety of mines, with some metal recycling as well.

There are an estimated 7 billion mobile phones worldwide. Here is a list of what they typically contain:

Copper – circuitry

Europium – LCD screen colour (red)

Gallium arsenide - amplifier and receiver

Gold - circuitry

Magnesium compounds - phone case

Neodymium – magnet in the speaker

Palladium - circuitry

Petroleum products - plastic components

Platinum - circuitry

Silver – circuitry

Terbium – LCD screen colour (green)

Tungsten - circuitry

For an idea of quantities, 130 million mobile phones are retired annually in the US, weighing collectively 14,000 tonnes, including copper (2100t), silver (46t), gold (4t), palladium (2t), and platinum (40kg).
Gold and silver are mined in New Zealand, where we also have potential in tungsten, copper, palladium and platinum, and rare earth elements (neodymium).